16 Comments Add yours

  1. John Maillet says:

    That’s a very interesting project in which each participant will have see their communities from varying perspectives. For instance, I, as a sports fan immediately look to identify stadiums and arenas in any city I visit for the first time and inevitably perceive parallels between their teams (including logos, colors & reputation) and the city at large.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mcfeats says:

      Thanks, John. Yes, two Red Sox fans (I am one myself) wanted to bring up Fenway Park in the first chapter. I said, “Hold on now. Just so you know, the founding fathers were not on the roster.”

      Like

  2. Bill M says:

    Great idea. Blogs are more permanent and are not lost 30 seconds after a silly tweet or other social media post. they take a bit of thought and work. Aps are ok on a phone, but even there I seldom use any except the GPS maps. I just read somewhere about social media be the demise of good thought and society in general, and how it leads to more problems than it is worth (to make this comment short).

    That is a great looking Royal 10.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mcfeats says:

      Agreed. I brought up typewriters at a big faculty meeting yesterday. Unfortunately, it’s a hard sell in corporate-driven education.

      I lucked out with that Royal 10. It was found in an abandoned storage unit. $35. I bought some new feet for it and it was ready to go.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Michael Arau says:

    I like this. My blog is a pile of random thought s that pretty much interest an audience of one. Me. Now you have my creative wheels turning. Hmmm…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mcfeats says:

      Thanks, Michael. I think any sustainable blog has to be full of random thoughts in order to keep the writer engaged.

      Like

  4. Michael Arau says:

    Getting outside of your classroom, what if the typo sphere took a stab at this?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mcfeats says:

      That would be cool. This is my blog from last year (it might sustain more interest): https://aml2020americandreamers.wordpress.com

      Like

  5. billmaclane says:

    I got to spend some time last night on the blog to which you link . Very nice blog filled with some great information and ideas. I’ll be revisiting. Hope your students find it just a great.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. billmaclane says:

    I see wordpress still uses my email even if I sign in as Bill M. One reason I use Blogger and not my WP account.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mcfeats says:

      Everything is a mess. I don’t use Blogger because Google runs it, but I have a Gmail account anyway. I’m waiting for the day when Google et al announces that they can scan all photos with words in order to watch those typewriter people.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Michael Arau says:

    Those “typewriter people”… Hahahahaha! The insurgency presses forward.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. John Cooper says:

    This project seems like such intense fun. I would have run with such an assignment, had the technology been available during my college years. I’m interested to see what your students do with it.

    After I explored the Geography of Who We Are site, I visited the AML2020 site and found myself intrigued by the cover image even before scrolling down. It looks like a town hall, but what’s New Deal Brad Pitt doing playing the accordion? Hmm, a 46-star flag: that puts it between 1908 and 1912. Scratch New Deal. Tired, bored faces, traveling clothes…a suitcase? I get it now! It’s an Ellis Island waiting room. That was a harsh era in so many ways, yet we were so welcoming to immigrants compared to now–at least to European immigrants. Where would our country be now without the great waves of Germans, Italians, Poles, and others a few generations ago? Certainly the places I’ve lived would have been poorer and less interesting.

    Aside from the inherent interest of presenting one’s research about a place in this way, I like the way it isn’t assumed that telling the stories of one’s place of origin must be a matter of pride. I wasn’t so much shaped by my place of origin as misshaped by it, but when I traveled to a non-English-speaking country for the first time and couldn’t make my individuality known by what I spoke, I realized for the first time how my unique personality is a tiny capstone on top of the great pyramid of my Americanness. It was one of the greatest expansions of self-understanding I’ve experienced.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mcfeats says:

      Agreed. We need to get away from all the “we’re number one” crap. All countries are equally fascinating. Every place has its good and bad history.

      I always am confused when fans cheer “USA” at hockey games. Most teams have only a few Americans on them. The players must roll their eyes.

      Like

    2. mcfeats says:

      I always tell my students: look far enough into your ancestral history and you’re going to find someone you are proud of and someone you are ashamed of. That’s just history.

      Liked by 1 person

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